No Joke: New Pseudogene Function Smiles on the Case for Creation

By Fazale Rana – April 1, 2020

Time to confess. I now consider myself an evolutionary creationist. I have no choice. The evidence for biological evolution is so overwhelming…

…Just kidding! April Fool’s!

I am still an old-earth creationist. Even though the evolutionary paradigm is the prevailing framework in biology, I am skeptical about facets of it. I am more convinced than ever that a creation model approach is the best way to view life’s origin, design, and history. It’s not to say that there isn’t evidence for common descent; there is. Still, even with this evidence, I prefer old-earth creationism for three reasons.

  • First, a creation model approach can readily accommodate the evidence for common descent within a design framework.
  • Second, the evolutionary paradigm struggles to adequately explain many of the key transitions in life’s history.
  • Third, the impression of design in biology is overwhelming—and it’s becoming more so every day.

And that is no joke.

Take the human genome as an example. When it comes to understanding its structure and function, we are in our infancy. As we grow in our knowledge and insight, it becomes increasingly apparent that the structural and functional features of the human genome (and the genomes of other organisms) display more elegance and sophistication than most life scientists could have ever imagined—at least, those operating within the evolutionary framework. On the other hand, the elegance and sophistication of genomes is expected for creationists and intelligent design advocates. To put it simply, the more we learn about the human genome, the more it appears to be the product of a Mind.

In fact, the advances in genomics over the last decade have forced life scientists to radically alter their views of genome biology. When the human genome was first sequenced in 2000, biologists considered most of the sequence elements to be nonfunctional, useless DNA. Now biologists recognize that virtually every class of these so-called junk DNA sequences serve key functional roles.

If most of the DNA sequence elements in the human genome were truly junk, then I’d agree that it makes sense to view them as evolutionary leftovers, especially because these junk DNA sequences appear in corresponding locations of the human and primate genomes. It is for these reasons that biologists have traditionally interpreted these shared sequences as the most convincing evidence for common descent.

However, now that we have learned that these sequences are functional, I think it is reasonable to regard them as the handiwork of a Creator, intentionally designed to contribute to the genome’s biology. In this framework, the shared DNA sequences in the human and primate genomes reflect common design, not common descent.

Still, many biologists reject the common design interpretation, while continuing to express confidence in the evolutionary model. Their certainty reflects a commitment to methodological naturalism, but there is another reason for their confidence. They argue that the human genome (and the genomes of other organisms) display other architectural and operational features that the evolutionary framework explains best—and, in their view, these features tip the scales toward the evolutionary interpretation.

Yet, researchers continue to make discoveries about junk DNA that counterbalance the evidence for common descent, including these structural and functional features. Recent insights into pseudogene biology nicely illustrate this trend.

Pseudogenes

Most life scientists view pseudogenes as the remnants of once-functional genes. Along these lines, biologists have identified three categories of pseudogenes (unitary, duplicated, and processed) and proposed three distinct mechanisms to explain the origin of each class. These mechanisms produce distinguishing features that allow investigators to identify certain DNA sequences as pseudogenes. However, a pre-commitment to the evolutionary paradigm can influence many biologists to declare too quickly that pseudogenes are nonfunctional based on their sequence characteristics.1

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The Mechanisms of Pseudogene Formation.
Image credit: Wikipedia.

As the old adage goes: theories guide, experiments decide. There is an accumulation of experimental data which indicates that pseudogenes from all three classes have utility.

A number of research teams have demonstrated that the cell’s machinery transcribes processed pseudogenes and, in turn, these transcripts are translated into proteins. Both duplicated and unitary pseudogenes are also transcribed. However, except for a few rare cases, these transcripts are not translated into proteins. Most of duplicated and unitary pseudogene transcripts serve a regulatory role, described by the competitive endogenous RNA hypothesis.

In other words, the experimental support for pseudogene function seemingly hinges on the transcription of these sequences. That leads to the question: What about pseudogene sequences located in genomes that aren’t transcribed? A number of pseudogenic sequences in genomes seemingly sit dormant. They aren’t transcribed and, presumably, have no utility whatsoever.

For many life scientists, this supports the evolutionary account for pseudogene origins, making it the preferred explanation over any model that posits the intentional design of pseudogene sequences. After all, why would a Creator introduce mutationally damaged genes that serve no function? Isn’t it better to explain the presence of functional processed pseudogenes as the result of neofunctionalization, whereby evolutionary mechanisms co-opt processed pseudogenes and use them as the raw material to evolve DNA sequence elements into new genes?

Or, perhaps, is it better to view the transcripts of regulatory unitary and duplicated pseudogenes as the functional remnants of the original genes whose transcripts played a role in regulatory networks with other RNA transcripts? Even though these pseudogenes no longer direct protein production, they can still take part in the regulatory networks comprised of RNA transcripts.

Are Untranscribed Pseudogenes Really Untranscribed?

Again, remember that support for the evolutionary interpretation of pseudogenes rests on the belief that some pseudogenes are not transcribed. What happens to this support if these DNA sequences are transcribed, meaning we simply haven’t detected or identified their transcripts experimentally?

As a case in point, in a piece for Nature Reviews, a team of collaborators from Australia argue that failure to detect pseudogene transcripts experimentally does not confirm the absence of a transcription.2 For example, the transcripts for a pseudogene transcribed at a low level may fall below the experimental detection limit. This particular pseudogene would appear inactive to researchers when, in fact, the opposite is the case. Additionally, pseudogene expression may be tissue-specific or may take place at certain points in the growth and development process. If the assay doesn’t take these possibilities into account, then failure to detect pseudogene transcripts could just mean that the experimental protocol is flawed.

The similarity of the DNA sequences of pseudogenes and their corresponding “sister” genes causes another complication. It can be hard to experimentally distinguish between a pseudogene and its “intact” sister gene. This limitation means that, in some instances, pseudogene transcripts may be misidentified as the transcripts of the “intact” gene. Again, this can lead researchers to conclude mistakenly that the pseudogene isn’t transcribed.

Are Untranscribed Pseudogenes Really Nonfunctional?

These very real experimental challenges notwithstanding, there are pseudogenes that indeed are not transcribed, but it would be wrong to conclude that they have no role in gene regulation. For example, a large team of international collaborators demonstrated that a pseudogene sequence contributes to the specific three-dimensional architecture of chromosomes. By doing so, this sequence exerts influence over gene expression, albeit indirectly.3

Another research team determined that a different pseudogene plays a role in maintaining chromosomal stability. In laboratory experiments, they discovered that deleting the DNA region that harbors this pseudogene increases chromosomal recombination events that result in the deletion of pieces of DNA. This deletion is catastrophic and leads to DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome.4

To be clear, these two studies focused on single pseudogenes. We need to be careful about extrapolating the results to all untranscribed pseudogenes. Nevertheless, at minimum, these findings open up the possibility that other untranscribed pseudogene sequences function in the same way. If past history is anything to go by when it comes to junk DNA, these two discoveries are most likely harbingers of what is to come. Simply put, we continue to uncover unexpected function for pseudogenes (and other classes of junk DNA).

Common Design or Common Descent?

Not that long ago, shared nonfunctional, junk DNA sequences in the human and primate genomes were taken as prima facia evidence for our shared evolutionary history with the great apes. There was no way to genuinely respond to the challenge junk DNA posed to creation models, other than to express the belief that we would one day discover function for junk DNA sequences.

Subsequently, discoveries have fulfilled a key scientific prediction made by creationists and intelligent design proponents alike. These initial discoveries involved single, isolated pseudogenes. Later studies demonstrated that pseudogene function is pervasive, leading to new scientific ideas such as the competitive endogenous RNA hypothesis, that connect the sequence similarity of pseudogenes and “intact” genes to pseudogene function. Researchers are beginning to identify functional roles for untranscribed pseudogenes. I predict that it is only a matter of time before biologists concede that the utility of untranscribed pseudogenes is pervasive and commonplace.

The creation model interpretation of shared junk DNA sequences becomes stronger and stronger with each step forward, which leads me to ask, When are life scientists going to stop fooling around and give a creation model approach a seat at the biology table?

Resources

Endnotes
  1. Seth W. Cheetham, Geoffrey J. Faulkner, and Marcel E. Dinger, “Overcoming Challenges and Dogmas to Understand the Functions of Pseudogenes,” Nature Reviews Genetics 21 (December 17, 2019): 191–201, doi:10.1038/s41576-019-0196-1.
  2. Cheetham et al., 191–201.
  3. Peng Huang, et al., “Comparative Analysis of Three-Dimensional Chromosomal Architecture Identifies a Novel Fetal Hemoglobin Regulatory Element,” Genes and Development 31, no. 16 (August 15, 2017): 1704–13, doi: 10.1101/gad.303461.117.
  4. Laia Vergés et al., “An Exploratory Study of Predisposing Genetic Factors for DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial Syndrome,” Scientific Reports 7 (January 6, 2017): id. 40031, doi: 10.1038/srep40031.

Reprinted with permission by the author

Original article at:

https://reasons.org/explore/blogs/the-cells-design

Does Evolutionary Bias Create Unhealthy Stereotypes about Pseudogenes?

By Fazale Rana – March 18, 2020

Truth be told, we all hold to certain stereotypes whether we want to admit it or not. Though unfair, more often than not, these stereotypes cause little real damage.

Yet, there are instances when stereotypes can be harmful—even deadly. As a case in point, researchers have shown that stereotyping disrupts the healthcare received by members of so-called disadvantaged groups, such as African Americans, Latinos, and the poor.1

Healthcare providers are frequently guilty of bias towards underprivileged people. Often, the stereotyping is unconscious and unintentional. Still, this bias compromises the medical care received by people in these ethnic and socioeconomic groups.

Underprivileged patients are also guilty of stereotyping. It is not uncommon for these patients to perceive themselves as the victims of prejudice, even when their healthcare providers are genuinely unbiased. As a result, these patients don’t trust healthcare workers and, consequently, withhold information that is vital for a proper diagnosis.

Fortunately, psychologists have developed best practices that can reduce stereotyping by both healthcare practitioners and patients. Hopefully, by implementing these practices, the impact of stereotyping on the quality of healthcare can be minimized over time.

Recently, a research team from Australia identified another form of stereotyping that holds the potential to negatively impact healthcare outcomes.2 In this case, the impact of this stereotyping isn’t limited to disadvantaged people; it affects all of us.

A Bias Against Pseudogenes

These researchers have uncovered a bias in the way life scientists view the human genome (and the genomes of other organisms). Too often they regard the human genome as a repository of useless, nonfunctional DNA that arises as a vestige of evolutionary history. Because of this view, life scientists and the biomedical research community eschew studying regions of the human genome they deem to be junk DNA. This posture is not unreasonable. It doesn’t make sense to invest precious scientific resources to study nonfunctional DNA.

Many life scientists are unaware of their bias. Unfortunately, this stereotyping hinders scientific advance by delaying discoveries that could be translated into the clinical setting. Quite often, supposed junk DNA has turned out to serve a vital purpose. Failure to recognize this function not only compromises our understanding of genome biology, but also hinders biomedical researchers from identifying defects in these genomic regions that contribute to genetic diseases and disorders.

As psychologists will point out, acknowledging bias is the first step to solving the problems that stereotyping causes. This is precisely what these researchers have done by publishing an article in Nature Review Genetics.3 The team focused on DNA sequence elements called pseudogenes. Traditionally, life scientists have viewed pseudogenes as the remnants of once functional genes. Biologists have identified three categories of pseudogenes: (1) unitary, (2) duplicated, and (3) processed.

Researchers categorize DNA sequences as pseudogenes based on structural features. Such features indicate to the investigators that these sequence elements were functional genes at one time in evolutionary history, but eventually lost function due to mutations or other biochemical processes, such as reverse transcription and DNA insertion. Once a DNA sequence is labeled a pseudogene, bias sets in and researchers just assume that it lacks function—not because it has been experimentally demonstrated to be nonfunctional, but because of the stereotyping that arises out of the evolutionary paradigm.

The authors of the piece acknowledge that “the annotation of genomics regions as pseudogenes constitutes an etymological signifier that an element has no function and is not a gene. As a result, pseudogene-annotated regions are largely excluded from functional screen and genomic analyses.”4 In other words, the “pseudogene” moniker biases researchers to such a degree that they ignore these sequence elements as they study genome structure and function without ever doing the hard, experimental work to determine whether it is actually nonfunctional.

This approach is clearly misguided and detracts from scientific discovery. As the authors admit, “However, with a growing number of instances of pseudogene-annotated regions later found to exhibit biological function, there is an emerging risk that these regions of the genome are prematurely dismissed as pseudogenic and therefore regarded as void of function.”5

Discovering Function Despite Bias

The harmful effects of this bias become evident as biomedical researchers unexpectedly stumble upon function for pseudogenes, time and time, again, not because of the evolutionary paradigm, but despite it. These authors point out that many processed pseudogenes are transcribed and, of those, many are translated to produce proteins. Many unitary and duplicated pseudogenes are also transcribed. Some are also translated into proteins, but a majority are not. Instead they play a role in gene regulation as described by the competitive endogenous RNA hypothesis.

Still, there are some pseudogenes that aren’t transcribed and, thus, could rightly be deemed nonfunctional. However, the researchers point out that the current experimental approaches for identifying transcribed regions are less than ideal. Many of these methods may fail to detect pseudogene transcripts. However, as the researchers point out, even if a pseudogene isn’t transcribed it still may serve a functional role (e.g., contributing to chromosome three-dimensional structure and stability).

This Nature article raises a number of questions and concerns for me as a biochemist:

  • How widespread is this bias?
  • If this type of stereotyping exists toward pseudogenes, does it exist for other classes of junk DNA?
  • How well do we really understand genome structure and function?
  • Do we have the wrong perspective on the genome, one that stultifies scientific advance?
  • Does this bias delay the understanding and alleviation of human health concerns?

Is the Evolutionary Paradigm the Wrong Framework to Study Genomes?

Based on this article, I think it is safe to conclude that we really don’t understand the molecular biology of genomes. We are living in the midst of a scientific revolution that is radically changing our view of genome structure and function. The architecture and operations of genomes appear to be far more elegant and sophisticated than anyone ever imagined—at least within the confines of the evolutionary paradigm.

This insight also leads me to question if the evolutionary paradigm is the proper framework for thinking about genome structure and function. From my perspective, treating biological systems as the Creator’s handiwork provides a superior approach to understanding the genome. A creation model approach promotes scientific advance, particularly when the rationale for the structure and function of a particular biological system is not apparent. This expectation forces researchers to keep an open mind and drives further study of seemingly nonfunctional, purposeless systems with the full anticipation that their functional roles will eventually be uncovered.

Over the last several years, I have raised concerns about the bias life scientists have harbored as they have worked to characterize the human genome (and genomes of other organisms). It is gratifying to me to see that there are life scientists who, though committed to the evolutionary paradigm, are beginning to recognize this bias as well.

The first step to addressing the problem of stereotyping—in any sector of society—is to acknowledge that it exists. Often, this step is the hardest one to take. The next step is to put in place structures to help overcome its harmful influence. Could it be that part of the solution to this instance of scientific stereotyping is to grant a creation model approach access to the scientific table?

Resources

Pseudogene Function

The Evolutionary Paradigm Hinders Scientific Advance

Endnotes
  1. For example, see Joshua Aronson et al., “Unhealthy Interactions: The Role of Stereotype Threat in Health Disparities,” American Journal of Public Health 103 (January 1, 2013): 50–56, doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.300828.
  2. Seth W. Cheetham, Geoffrey J. Faulkner, and Marcel E. Dinger, “Overcoming Challenges and Dogmas to Understand the Functions of Pseudogenes,” Nature Reviews Genetics 21 (March 2020): 191–201, doi:10.1038/s41576-019-0196-1.
  3. Cheetham, Faulkner, and Dinger, 191–201.
  4. Cheetham, Faulkner, and Dinger, 191–201.
  5. Cheetham, Faulkner, and Dinger, 191–201.

Reprinted with permission by the author

Original article at:

https://reasons.org/explore/blogs/the-cells-design

Competitive Endogenous RNA Hypothesis Supports the Case for Creation

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BY FAZALE RANA – MAY 15, 2019

When Francis Crick, codiscoverer of the DNA double helix, first conceived of molecular biology’s organizing principle in 1958, he dubbed it the central dogma. He soon came to regret the term. In his autobiographical account, What Mad Pursuit, Crick writes:

I called this idea the central dogma, for two reasons, I suspect. I had already used the obvious word hypothesis in the sequence hypothesis, and in addition I wanted to suggest that this new assumption was more central and more powerful….As it turned out, the use of the word dogma caused almost more trouble than it was worth. Many years later Jacques Monod pointed out to me that I did not appear to understand the correct use of the word dogma, which is a belief that cannot be doubted. I did apprehend this in a vague sort of way but since I thought that all religious beliefs were without foundation, I used the word the way I myself thought about it, not as most of the world does, and simply applied it to a grand hypothesis that, however plausible, had little direct experimental support.1

Even though Crick rued labeling his idea as “dogma,” the term seems to fit, all the connotations aside, because of its singular importance to molecular biology.

The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology

The central dogma of molecular biology describes the directional flow of information in the cell, which moves from DNA to RNA to proteins. Information can flow from DNA to DNA during DNA replication, from DNA to RNA during transcription, and from RNA back to DNA during reverse transcription. However, biochemical information can’t flow from proteins to either RNA or DNA.

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Figure 1: The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology. Image credit: Shutterstock

Is There a New Dogma in Molecular Biology?

In my opinion as a biochemist, if there is an idea that has the potential to rival the significance of the central dogma, it just might be the competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) hypothesis. This newer model provides a comprehensive description of the role messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules play in regulating gene expression, thereby influencing the flow of information from DNA to proteins.

The ceRNA hypothesis also provides an elegant rationale for why the genomes of eukaryotic organisms contain pseudogenes (including unitary pseudogenes) and encode long noncoding RNA molecules. Additionally, it explains why duplicated pseudogenes resemble corresponding intact genes. In doing all this, the ceRNA hypothesis provides support for the RTB’s genomics model—which interprets the structure and activities associated with genomes from a creation or design standpoint. (An overview of the RTB genomics model can be found in the updated and expanded 2nd edition of Who Was Adam?)

The Competitive Endogenous RNA Hypothesis

I discuss the ceRNA hypothesis in a previous article. So, I’ll offer just a brief description here. According to the central dogma, the final step in the flow of biochemical information is the production of proteins at the ribosome, directed by the information housed in mRNA. Biochemists have discovered an elaborate mechanism that selectively degrades mRNA transcripts before they can reach this point. This degradation process controls gene expression by dictating the amount of protein produced.

Molecules called microRNAs bind to the mRNA’s 3′ untranslated region, which flags the transcript for destruction by RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). A number of distinct microRNA species exist in the cell. Each microRNA species bind to specific sites in the 3′ untranslated region of mRNA transcripts. (These binding locations are called microRNA response elements or MREs.)

A network of genes shares the same set of MREs and, consequently, will bind to the same set of microRNAs. When one gene is transcribed, it will influence the expression of all the other genes in its network. And when one gene in the network becomes up-regulated (leading to increased transcription of that gene), the expression of all the genes in the network increases. Why? Because the increased level of that particular transcript exerts a “sponge effect” that consumes more of the microRNAs that would otherwise target other transcripts for degradation.

The Competitive Endogenous RNA Hypothesis and the Role of Junk DNA

The ceRNA hypothesis elegantly explains the functional utility of three classes of junk DNA: duplicated and unitary pseudogenes, plus long noncoding RNAs. As it turns out, the transcripts produced from these types of so-called junk DNA also harbor MREs. None of these transcripts codes for proteins yet they play an indispensable role in regulating gene expression. In fact, all three are much better suited for the role of molecular sponges precisely because they aren’t translated into proteins.

Of particular utility are duplicated pseudogenes due to their close structural resemblance to the corresponding coding genes. Duplicated pseudogenes not only exert a sponge effect but also serve as decoys that allow the transcripts of the intact genes to escape degradation and to be translated into proteins.

Is the Competitive Endogenous RNA Hypothesis Valid?

This question has generated a minor scientific controversy. Some studies provide experimental support for this idea while others question the physiological relevance of ceRNAs. In light of this debate, a team of researchers headed by investigators from Columbia University sought to validate this hypothesis on a large-scale.They discovered that ceRNA interactions can disrupt the expression of thousands of genes. The team concluded that “ceRNA regulation is the norm not the exception…and that ceRNA interactions have genome-wide effects on gene expression.”3

These researchers think that this insight sheds light on tumor biology because dysregulation of ceRNAs have been implicated in some cancers. Their work also has theological significance because it undermines one of the most significant challenges to design arguments and, in turn, can be marshaled in support of the RTB genomics model.

The Competitive Endogenous Hypothesis and the Case for a Creator

Evolutionary biologists have long maintained that identical (or nearly identical) junk DNA sequences (such as pseudogene sequences) found in corresponding locations in genomes of organisms that naturally cluster together (such as humans and the great apes) provide compelling evidence that these organisms must have evolved from a shared ancestor. This interpretation was compelling because junk DNA sequences seemed to be useless vestiges of evolutionary history.

Creationists and intelligent design proponents had little to offer by way of evidence for the intentional design of genomes. But research in recent years has revealed that virtually every class of junk DNA has function. It seems, then, that shared junk DNA sequences can be understood as shared designs, which is what the RTB genomics model predicts.

Additionally, the ceRNA hypothesis supports the RTB genomics even further. This hypothesis provides an elegant explanation for the widespread existence of pseudogenes in genomes and their structural similarity to intact genes.

Could it be that the idea of religious dogma affirming a Creator’s role in life’s design and history has merit?

Resources

Endnotes
  1. Francis Crick, What Mad Pursuit (New York: Basic Books, 1988), 109.
  2. Hua-Sheng Chiu et al., “High-Throughput Validation of ceRNA Regulatory Networks,” BMC Genomics 18 (2017): 418, doi:10.1186/s12864-017-3790-7.
  3. Chiu et al., 418.

Reprinted with permission by the author
Original article at:
https://www.reasons.org/explore/blogs/the-cells-design/read/the-cells-design/2019/05/15/competitive-endogenous-rna-hypothesis-supports-the-case-for-creation

Pseudogene Discovery Pains Evolutionary Paradigm

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BY FAZALE RANA – MAY 8, 2019

It was one of the most painful experiences I ever had. A few years ago, I had two back-to-back bouts of kidney stones. I remember it as if it were yesterday. Man, did it hurt when I passed the stones! All I wanted was for the emergency room nurse to keep the Demerol coming.

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Figure 1: Schematic Depiction of Kidney Stones Moving through the Urinary Tract. Image Credit: Shutterstock

When all that misery was going down, I wished I was one of those rare individuals who doesn’t experience pain. There are some people who, due to genetic mutations, live pain-free lives. This condition is called hypoalgesia. (Of course, there is a serious downside to hypoalgesia. Pain lets us know when our body is hurt or sick. Because hypoalgesics can’t experience pain, they are prone to serious injury, etc.)

Biomedical researchers possess a keen interest in studying people with hypoalgesia. Identifying the mutations responsible for this genetic condition helps investigators understand the physiological processes that undergird the pain sensation. This insight then becomes indispensable to guiding efforts to develop new drugs and techniques to treat pain.

By studying the genetic profile of a 66-year-old woman who lived a lifetime with pain-free injuries, a research team from the UK recently discovered a novel genetic mutation that causes hypoalgesia.1 The mutation responsible for this patient’s hypoalgesia occurred in a pseudogene, a region of the genome considered nonfunctional “junk DNA.”

This discovery adds to the mounting evidence that shows junk DNA is functional. At this point, molecular geneticists have demonstrated that virtually every class of junk DNA has function. This notion undermines the best evidence for common descent and, hence, undermines an evolutionary interpretation of biology. More importantly, the discovery adds support for the competitive endogenous RNA hypothesis, which can be marshaled to support RTB’s genomics model. It is becoming more and more evident to me that genome structure and function reflect the handiwork of a Creator.

The Role of a Pseudogene in Mediating Hypoalgesia

To identify the genetic mutation responsible for the 66-year-old’s hypoalgesia, the research team scanned her DNA along with samples taken from her mother and two children. The team discovered two genetic changes: (1) mutations to the FAAH gene that reduced its expression, and (2) deletion of part of the FAAH pseudogene.

The FAAH gene encodes for a protein called fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). This protein breaks down fatty acid amides. Some of these compounds interact with cannabinoid receptors. These receptors are located in the membranes of cells found in tissues throughout the body. They mediate pain sensation, among other things. When fatty acid amide concentrations become elevated in the circulatory system, it produces an analgesic effect.

Researchers found elevated fatty acid amide levels in the patient’s blood, consistent with reduced expression of the FAAH gene. It appears that both mutations are required for the complete hypoalgesia observed in the patient. The patient’s mother, daughter, and son all display only partial hypoalgesia. The mother and daughter have the same mutation in the FAAH gene but an intact FAAH pseudogene. The patient’s son is missing the FAAH pseudogene, but has a “normal” FAAH gene.

Based on the data, it looks like proper expression levels of the FAAH gene require an intact FAAH pseudogene. This is not the first time that biomedical researchers have observed the same effect. There are a number of gene-pseudogene pairs in which both must be intact and transcribed for the gene to be expressed properly. In 2011, researchers from Harvard University proposed that the competitive endogenous RNA hypothesis explains why transcribed pseudogenes are so important for gene expression.2

The Competitive Endogenous RNA Hypothesis

Biochemists and molecular biologists have long believed that the primary mechanism for regulating gene expression centered around controlling the frequency and amount of mRNA produced during transcription. For housekeeping genes, mRNA is produced continually, while for genes that specify situational proteins, it is produced as needed. Greater amounts of mRNA are produced for genes expressed at high levels and limited amounts for genes expressed at low levels.

Researchers long thought that once the mRNA was produced it would be translated into proteins, but recent discoveries indicate this is not the case. Instead, an elaborate mechanism exists that selectively degrades mRNA transcripts before they can be used to direct the protein production at the ribosome. This mechanism dictates the amount of protein produced by permitting or preventing mRNA from being translated. The selective degradation of mRNA also plays a role in gene expression, functioning in a complementary manner to the transcriptional control of gene expression.

Another class of RNA molecules, called microRNAs, mediates the selective degradation of mRNA. In the early 2000s, biochemists recognized that by binding to mRNA (in the 3′ untranslated region of the transcript), microRNAs play a crucial role in gene regulation. Through binding, microRNAs flag the mRNA for destruction by RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC).

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Figure 2: Schematic of the RNA-Induced Silencing Mechanism. Image Credit: Wikipedia

Various distinct microRNA species in the cell bind to specific sites in the 3′ untranslated region of mRNA transcripts. (These binding locations are called microRNA response elements.) The selective binding by the population of microRNAs explains the role that duplicated pseudogenes play in regulating gene expression.

The sequence similarity between the duplicated pseudogene and the corresponding “intact” gene means that the same microRNAs will bind to both mRNA transcripts. (It is interesting to note that most duplicated pseudogenes are transcribed.) When microRNAs bind to the transcript of the duplicated pseudogene, it allows the transcript of the “intact” gene to escape degradation. In other words, the transcript of the duplicated pseudogene is a decoy. The mRNA transcript can then be translated and, hence, the “intact” gene expressed.

It is not just “intact” and duplicated pseudogenes that harbor the same microRNA response elements. Other genes share the same set of microRNA response elements in the 3′ untranslated region of the transcripts and, consequently, will bind the same set of microRNAs. These genes form a network that, when transcribed, will influence the expression of all genes in the network. This relationship means that all the mRNA transcripts in the network can function as decoys. This recognition accounts for the functional utility of unitary pseudogenes.

One important consequence of this hypothesis is that mRNA has dual functions inside the cell. First, it encodes information needed to make proteins. Second, it helps regulate the expression of other transcripts that are part of its network.

Junk DNA and the Case for Creation

Evolutionary biologists have long maintained that identical (or nearly identical) pseudogene sequences found in corresponding locations in genomes of organisms that naturally group together (such as humans and the great apes) provide compelling evidence for shared ancestry. This interpretation was persuasive because molecular geneticists regarded pseudogenes as nonfunctional, junk DNA. Presumably, random biochemical events transformed functional DNA sequences (genes) into nonfunctional garbage.

Creationists and intelligent design proponents had little to offer by way of evidence for the intentional design of genomes. But all this changed with the discovery that virtually every class of junk DNA has function, including all three types of pseudogenes (processed, duplicated, and unitary).

If junk DNA is functional, then the sequences previously thought to show common descent could be understood as shared designs. The competitive endogenous RNA hypothesis supports this interpretation. This model provides an elegant rationale for the structural similarity between gene-pseudogene pairs and also makes sense of the widespread presence of unitary pseudogenes in genomes.

Of course, this insight also supports the RTB genomics model. And that sure feels good to me.

Resources

Endnotes
  1. Abdella M. Habib et al., “Microdeletion in a FAAH Pseudogene Identified in a Patient with High Anandamide Concentrations and Pain Insensitivity,” British Journal of Anaesthesia, advanced access publication, doi:10.1016/j.bja.2019.02.019.
  2. Ana C. Marques, Jennifer Tan, and Chris P. Ponting, “Wrangling for microRNAs Provokes Much Crosstalk,” Genome Biology 12, no. 11 (November 2011): 132, doi:10.1186/gb-2011-12-11-132; Leonardo Salmena et al., “A ceRNA Hypothesis: The Rosetta Stone of a Hidden RNA Language?”, Cell 146, no. 3 (August 5, 2011): 353–58, doi:10.1016/j.cell.2011.07.014.

Reprinted with permission by the author
Original article at:
https://www.reasons.org/explore/blogs/the-cells-design/read/the-cells-design/2019/05/08/pseudogene-discovery-pains-evolutionary-paradigm