A Good Reason for Evil

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What is evil? Could it have a purpose? Here is a view of evil from an adult rather than a childish perspective.

The first step in answering the problem of evil is this: We’ve got to get clear on what this thing “evil” actually is. It does seem to follow that if God created all things, and evil is a thing, then God created evil. This is a valid syllogism. If the premises are true, then the conclusion would be true as well.

The problem with that line of reasoning is that the second premise is not true. Evil is not a thing. The person who probably explained it best was St. Augustine, and then Thomas Aquinas picked up on his solution. Others since them have argued that evil has no ontological status in itself.

The word ontology deals with the nature of existence. When I say that evil has no ontological status, I mean that evil, as a thing in itself, does not exist.

Let me give you an illustration to make this more clear. We talk about things being cold or warm. But coldness is not a thing that exists in itself; it has no ontological status. Coldness is the absence of heat. When we remove heat energy from a system, we say it gets colder.

“Cold” isn’t a thing. It’s a way of describing the reduction of molecular activity resulting in the sensation of heat. So the more heat we pull out of a system, the colder it gets. Cold itself isn’t being “created.” Cold is a description of a circumstance in which heat is missing. Heat is energy which can be measured. When you remove heat, the temperature goes down. We call that condition “cold,” but there is no cold “stuff” that causes that condition.

Here’s another way of looking at it. Did you ever eat a donut hole? I don’t mean those little round sugar-coated lumps you buy at the donut shop. I mean the hole itself. Donut holes are actually what’s left when the middle is cut out of a donut. There’s a space called a hole, a “nothing,” the condition that exists when something is taken away. Same thing with a shadow. Shadows don’t exist as things in themselves; they’re just the absence of light.

Evil is like that. Evil isn’t like some black, gooey stuff floating around the universe that gloms onto people and causes them to do awful things. Evil is the absence of good, a privation of good, not a thing in itself.

When God created the universe, he created everything good. He made a universe that was perfectly good. Everything was as it should be. After God was completely done with creating everything, something happened that reduced the good in the world. That loss of good is called evil.

That’s why in Genesis 1 we read “it was good” many times. From the record we know that God didn’t create evil. But something did happen in which evil-the loss of good-took place, and as a result a lot of other grotesque things came about.

So donut holes don’t exist; they’re just the absence of donut. Shadows don’t exist; they’re just the absence of light. And evil doesn’t exist; it’s just the absence of good.

The next question is, if God created everything good, why would He allow evil to infect His creation?

Satan would be the first example of an independent source of evil. Adam and Eve would also be a source of evil with regard to the human race. They didn’t get Satan’s evil; they initiated their own. Satan influenced them–he made his own hole in goodness–but Adam and Eve made their own holes in goodness. They’re responsible for their own evil.

It isn’t that Satan did something bad and passed that stuff on to them, because evil is not a stuff. This is a key point in this discussion. They cannot “dip into” evil because it’s not a thing to dip into. When we make a shadow, we don’t do it with shadow stuff, but by blocking existing light.

In the same way, evil doesn’t cause our actions. In fact, it’s the other way around. Our actions are what cause evil-or the loss of goodness-in us, and that loss of goodness does have an impact on future actions, giving us a predisposition to cause further evil.

God did not create Adam and Eve with bad stuff in them. What He did was to create them with a capability to rebel against Him or choose to do wrong. This is called moral free will, and it’s a good thing, but it can be used for bad. It can be used to rebel against God, which digs out a hole in goodness, so to speak.

Satan and man both used their free moral agency to originate actions that fell short of the goodness of God. I’m sure God had a good reason for allowing evil. It has caused a lot of suffering, but that suffering has, in turn, also brought about a lot of good under God’s direction.

When you forgive someone who’s wronged you and you treat him kindly, is that a good thing? Sure it is, but you couldn’t forgive him if he hadn’t done something bad against you. I’m not saying that we should do evil so that the good of forgiveness could come about. I’m showing that it’s not a contradiction to claim that good can come out of evil.

It’s not good to promote evil itself, but one of the things about God is that He’s capable of taking a bad thing and making good come out of it. Mercy is one example of that. Without sin there would be no mercy. That’s true of a number of good things: bearing up under suffering, dealing with injustice, acts of heroism, forgiveness, long-suffering. These are all virtues that cannot be experienced in a world with no sin and evil.

Now the real question at this point is, “Was it worth it? Good can come out of evil, but was it worth it in the long run, the measure of good that comes out of the measure of evil in the world?” And my response is that the only One who could ever know that is God. You and I couldn’t know that because our perspective is too limited. Only God is in a position to accurately answer that question.

Apparently God thinks that, on balance, the good is going to outweigh the evil that caused the good, or else He wouldn’t have allowed it to happen. Christ paid a tremendous price, an example of the tremendous love God had for us. God would not be able to show His sacrificial love unless there was something to sacrifice for.

Here’s the problem, and this is why we don’t think that, on balance, it’s really a fair trade. We think that life is about giving us pleasure and making us happy. That’s what we think. This view is very prevalent in the United States. Our personal happiness, pleasure, and enjoyment are the most important things in life.

That’s not what the Bible teaches at all, though. There are aspects of enjoyment, but the ultimate reason we were created was not so we can have fun and enjoy life. God’s purpose for creating us was to develop us into certain types of people who were fit to spend eternity with Him. He does that by conforming us to His image by helping us grow through the process of living in a fallen world.

This is part of the message of the book of Hebrews. Even Jesus was conformed-made mature-by the process of suffering. In God’s mind, the goal of the process-being conformed to the image of His Son-is a much greater good than the bad of the evil that we have to put up with on this earth. The balance is definitely on the side of good.

I admit that this is not an easy issue, and part of the reason is that we bring some baggage to the discussion. Part of the baggage is that we have this idea that if God put us here on this earth and created the world for us to live in, then it seems to make sense that the summum bonum-the greatest good-is our immediate sense of personal pleasure and satisfaction. Therefore, if there is some circumstance in which we can’t have immediate satisfaction, then God must either have abandoned us, not exist, or be evil for allowing such a thing.

Last weekend I had a conversation with a young man about homosexuality. He challenged me with this point: Why would God create people as homosexuals if He didn’t want them to experience the pleasure of homosexual sex?

Now, of course, I didn’t agree with Him that God created people to be homosexuals. It wasn’t God’s design that they have this desire. But even if I conceded such a thing, why must I admit that-since one was created with a capacity for pleasure-only a mean, cruel God would allow conditions in which they’d have to say no to that pleasure?

When you think about it for a moment, doesn’t it strike you as odd that we’ve developed a view that in order for us to acknowledge God as good, He must give liberty to all of our passions? And if God doesn’t give liberty to all of our passions-if He doesn’t allow us what we want, when we want it-if He ever asks for self sacrifice, if He ever allows a condition in which we hurt, in which we suffer, in which we are inconvenienced, if He ever allows a circumstance in which our bodily desires are not given full reign, then certainly He must be a cruel God? Isn’t that an odd view?

Do you know what kind of person thinks that way? A child. A child sees what it wants and goes to get it, and if it’s stopped, that child puts up a fuss.

I was with a little two-year-old today who wanted to go into the house while wearing muddy shoes. She was stopped, and she put up a fuss when her shoes were removed. Mom and Dad knew, though, that there were other things more important than their daughter’s desires at that moment. Now she didn’t understand it. All she knew was what she wanted (understandably, by the way, she’s a two-year-old; that’s the way two-year-olds think).

Unfortunately, we’ve bred a society that are, in many ways, like a bunch of adult two-year-olds, grown-ups who believe it’s their divine right to feel every pleasure they can possibly feel, to never encounter any difficulty, any pain, any suffering. And if they do, then God must be a cruel God.

Now I realize that some of you might be thinking, Come on, Koukl, you’re really whitewashing this, aren’t you. How can so much egregious suffering be justified?

I don’t at all mean to brush away the terrible impact of evil on people’s lives. But I’m talking about a frame of mind that we do seem to have, a frame of mind that we are first and our pleasures are first and God owes that to us. And if He denies us our pleasures to any degree, then there must be something wrong with Him.

Now if God is a good God, and He denies us our pleasures, then I’ll tell you one thing, there’s a good reason He does so. That’s what it means to be a good God. I’m not going to buy the idea-the infantile idea that Americans have-that in order for God to be considered good, He has to give me everything I want, when I want it, or conversely, He must protect me from every injury and every difficulty. No, it’s fair to say that God has allowed suffering in the world for very good reasons, even though we’re not clear on all of those reasons.

By the way, what’s the alternative? If you conclude there’s no God because of the existence of evil, then there’s no possibility of ever redeeming that evil for good.

British philosopher Bertrand Russell said that no one can sit at the bedside of a dying child and still believe in God. My response to Mr. Russell is, “What would you say to a dying child?” What could an atheist say? “Too bad”? “Tough luck”? “Bum deal”? You see, in that circumstance, there’s no possibility of redemption for that evil. In fact, it doesn’t seem to make sense to even call it evil at all if there is no God.

But with God, at least there’s the possibility that the evil can be used for good. That’s the promise of the Scriptures.

And so, instead of the syllogism, “God created all things, and evil is a thing, therefore God created evil,” we start from a different point. “All things God created are good-which is what the text says-and evil isn’t good, therefore God didn’t create evil.” Then we can progress to, “If God created all things, and God didn’t create evil, then evil is not a thing.”

You see, those two syllogisms are just as valid as the first one (if God created all things, and evil is a thing, then God created evil), and it seems that the premises are more reliable. The premises seem to be accurate and true.

The questions we have to ask ourselves are: Do we have reason to think that God is good, and do we have reason to think that evil is not a thing? If we have good reasons to think those two things, then our new set of syllogisms work.

We can then strongly trust that when God does allow a privation of good (evil) to influence our lives, He does it not for evil designs, but ultimately for good purposes.


This is a transcript of a commentary from the radio show “Stand to Reason,” with Gregory Koukl. It is made available to you at no charge through the faithful giving of those who support Stand to Reason. Reproduction permitted for non-commercial use only. ©1997 Gregory Koukl

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The Origin of Evil

By Douglas L. Duncan, December 15, 2018

“The perplexing concept of evil eternally pleads the mind of God.”
– Douglas L. Duncan

If you have ever asked yourself any variation of the question, “Might there be a single source where the whole of evil came from, and if it is indeed a source at all, then what is it?”, both a belief in that which is unseen, coupled with sound deductive reasoning, will eventually whisper back, that what we are inquiring about is obviously some intangible, yet seemingly created thing, and such a powerful and ethereal type emergence as this evil surely is, it could only have originated from an even more powerful… indeed, totally omniscient and omnipotent Creative force.

Fortunately for us, this magnificently divine Entity came with a Manual, when if referred to, pretty clearly explains that this is indeed the source as well as the case for the origin of evil, and by studying ancient scripture, and discerning what they mean for our reality and temporal existence, we can arrive at a clearer understanding of why evil has been woven into the whole of humanity since the Garden of Eden.

First of all, evil is not a tangible thing. It is a manifesting, multi-faceted, cerebral process, which is unceasingly meted out with exacting purpose, yet always subject to termination at any point that the Creator chooses to end its existence and free humanity from its cruel vice-like grip. To get a child-like layman’s grasp on the reason for evil upon this earth, try thinking of it as a life sentence for all of us, in a federal prison that encompasses the entire planet, and you will begin to have a reasonable picture of what is really happening here. We are all guilty by association of the first sin, and evil is the iron bars of the holding cell that surrounds us, with thorns growing up from the floor.

Our sufferings on this earth, are both permissible and inescapable. They are the unrelenting judgment that was passed upon man from the time of Adam and Eve’s disobedience. It is utter foolishness to ask the atheist’s famous question, “If God exists, why does He allow bad things to happen?” They are supposed to happen because this temporal existence is a life sentence in the prison library, wherein we are supposed to be studying to get our diploma in General Studies 101, and through faith, an eventual pardon. We are all living in a fallen state, abounding with evil, and it is not meant to be a joy ride, totally free of consequences. We were born into sin and suffering, and we will die with it stuck to the bottom of our walking shoes.

The initial, manifestation of God’s awareness of evil, was the endowing of an abundance of pride, combined with free will like that of humans, in His creation of the most beautiful of all the angels. There are no detailed physical attributes recorded in the bible of this being, but he certainly was not red with pointed ears, horns, and a forked tail, and by logical association of him being synonymous with music, it is also doubtful he is a towering, snake-eyed, hulk-muscled beast. No, this lovable, pretty boy Robert Redford doppelganger, He singled out, and named Lucifer, or as he became affectionately known, ‘The Bright (helel) Morning Star’. He was in turn, given a distinguished position of authority as Heaven’s tremendously gifted choir director.

The ancient written records strongly imply, he is a master music composer and a superior orator, not a fighting angel like Gabriel or Michael. He has the gift of mental prowess and cunning manipulation, and once his pride over these attributes set in, and he began aspiring to the same status as God, God expelled him just as He knew He would be doing, along with all his faithful followers, who roughly totaled one-third of Heaven, and who we now refer to as demons, straight down here, of all the places in the universe, to our tiny earth, thus placing the epitome of evil on this very planet, for untold eons before creating us.

Of ‘Helel’ the bright one who stood behind the King of Tyre.

12 ‘Thus says the Lord GOD, “You were the seal of perfection, full of wisdom and perfect in beauty. 13 You were in Eden, the garden of God; every precious stone adorned you… Your settings and mountings were made of gold; on the day you were created they were prepared. 14 You were anointed as a guardian cherub, for so I ordained you. You were on the holy mount of God; you walked among the fiery stones. 15 You were blameless in your ways from the day you were created till wickedness was found in you.
Ezekiel 28:12-15

12 How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! 13 You said in your heart, “I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.”
Isaiah 14:12-14

Whether it was Lucifer himself or perhaps a comrade even more menacing than him, that appeared as a serpent-like entity in the tree of the fruit of knowledge of good and evil (come on, seriously… an apple?), growing in the garden of Eden, the fact remains, that they were already waiting in the shadows for homosapien’s arrival, and God knew that all too well. It cannot be denied, because He is the one setting everything in motion, from the point where He says, “Let there be light!”

Either we say God is in control, or we say He is not. The truth is, He was certainly powerful enough to have just as easily sent Lucifer and his horde all the way out to Pluto or another Galaxy altogether, but instead He purposely put us both together on the same rock. So why did the fallen angels need to be on this planet only to interferingly cohabit with us? Well, that becomes pretty obvious at this point. They are here to serve His purpose as an intrinsic and necessary half of the yinyang free will concept given specifically to homosapien. Are we to suppose that the omniscient Creator had no clue what Lucifer would do right from man’s start? If you think He was in the dark about it, I am afraid you have the wrong, and not so all knowing god.


Grandpa’s Wallet

In order to implant evil in man’s thoughts, all God had to do was place a single element in his path, which in this case was a unique tree in the garden, whos intoxicating fruit, when eaten, brings the yin and yang together, and opens the mind to corruption, like the lid on Pandora’s box,

This is uncannily similar to the old story of the grandfather placing his wallet on the table in front of his five-year-old grandchild and saying, “I have to leave the room for a minute, but I’ll be right back, so don’t you dare touch this wallet!” No sooner does he get out of sight, and peek around the corner, than the child has completely dragged everything in the wallet out, and onto the floor. Had God not purposely executed this very same scenario whereby man inevitably falls, and then is forced to seek God out, He would have just ended up with more angels, who were weaker than the original ones, that already knew Him. The entire human project would have been analogous to a soft, half-made clay jar being spun on the potter’s wheel, that suddenly goes off kilter and collapses back into a distorted heap of grey mud.

The Origin of Evil

Nothing exists that was not wrought by God, and unrelenting cogitative evil exists and resides in the minds of Satan and man.

“You are worthy, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things, and by your will they were created and have their being.”
Revelation 4:11


As stated earlier, evil is a concept in the mind, and it is a concept that was first in God’s mind, not a tangible thing related to the laws of physics. You cannot see, touch, feel, smell or hear evil. It is not one of the fundamental forces of nature, nor does it consist of matter, energy, or the spatial dimensions of the universe, and it continues until terminated. Yet evil does reside. It takes up residence in the minds of both humans and fallen angels.

It is an unseen and extremely powerful force, which plays a pivotal role in bringing souls to a position of having to seek God for solace, and its consequence also includes a prolonged, agonizing stay of execution for Lucifer and his fallen company. This is understandably making them all the more vengeful to the bitter end. These angels were all created in the very presence of God, and because of this, there are none in need of discovering Him, nor are they created with the unique creative thinking ability we have been specially endowed with, and that God was needing, to ultimately commune with Him on His own personal level. In all of this, we are above the angels, and it is written, they serve us. Basically, we are the one-of-a-kind product of the Creator’s words, “Let us make man, in our own image”, not the image of angels, and definitely not the same mental capacity. God knows that pain and suffering make us who we are. It is just as the fictional Star Trek character, Captain Kirk said,

“Damn it, Bones, you’re a doctor. You know that pain and guilt can’t be taken away with a wave of a magic wand. They’re the things we carry with us, the things that make us who we are. If we lose them, we lose ourselves. I don’t want my pain taken away. I need my pain.”

God actually proclaims He is the original holder of the concept of evil, and there are several revealing passages within the Old Testament, which Christians try hard to avoid or scratch their heads in confusion, and those who do give them attention, immediately feel the need to explain it away, for the simple reason that they cannot fathom a benevolent Creator, being the author of such a seemingly negative concept. Being the conceptual author and being the perpetrator thereof, is two entirely different things.

I form the light, and create darkness; I make peace, and create evil; I, the Lord, do all these things.
Isaiah 45:7

Out of the mouth of the Most High proceedeth not evil and good?
Lamentations 3:38

Shall a trumpet be blown in the city, and the people not be afraid? Shall there be evil in a city, and the Lord hath not done it?
Amos 3:6

These are God’s words through His ancient prophets, so arguing it should prove easy since they are dust. Evil exists because God saw the necessity to take it from awareness to implementation, regardless of the inadequacy of human comprehension. Evil didn’t just walk around the corner of the garage one day, and say, “Hey, has anybody seen Lucifer around here lately?” In juxtaposition to God’s ability to go from drawing board to structure with His voice, Lucifer is powerless to create anything. His only expertise is manipulation and that, like his music, is nothing more than variations on a theme.

“All things came into being through Him, and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being.”
John 1:3

Evil went from concept to practice long before we got here, so it appears to me, you have to ask yourself this question. “Am I going to accept this above scribbling by the apostle John as truth, or rip out this part because it is utterly ridiculous and unacceptable.

“Well are you punk?”

 

Evil Truly Exists

Yes, but not without true purpose. Think about the definition of the word omniscience. Do we suppose that God, in His omniscience, was ever clueless that Lucifer would wail against Him, thus manifesting what was previously only an awareness in His mind? It is the element of evil that ultimately causes us to seek His face, whereas with angels who know Him, there is no positive benefit to it whatsoever. God didn’t want more angels. What He has always wanted is family that can attain closer to his level of understanding, and share creative thinking with Him, and subsequently, genuine love on a personal level. We were specially created with the extra capacity to achieve total sentience. Angels are clearly not capable of this, or we simply would not be here, with them written to be watching over us.

Apostle John, the Revelator wrote that one day in a far distant future, God plans to free Lucifer from his chains to once again roam helter-skelter, up and down, and to and fro in the earth, after Christ has reigned on earth for a peaceful one thousand years, which translates to intent to use evil one more time.

“And when the thousand years are expired, Satan shall be loosed out of his prison…”
Revelation 20:7

Only after that shall God finally return evil to a mere concept in His mind. It is doubtless unwise to argue the point of evil with God. It is His favorite Craftsman multi-purpose tool for bringing man to his knees, and without it, there is no hope of a higher attainment. I suggest you pull yourself up by your bootstraps, put your hard hat on and go with it.

By Douglas L. Duncan

Further Reading: A Good Reason for Evil.

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Get Angry With God Like Job

jobsuffers

“God’s Wrath” is referred to ninety-five times in the Bible.

One time he even said, “…“I will wipe from the face of the earth the human race I have created… and with them the animals, the birds and the creatures that move along the ground… for I regret that I have made them.” ~Genesis 6:7

Obviously He didn’t finish the job, because we’re still here… and so are all the other creatures He said, He would wipe from the face of the earth.

Anger is an ‘Emotion’ like all the rest of emotions. We are the ‘Image of God’, so there ya go. He spills out His wrath… we spill out our wrath.

Get angry at God. Job did. You’ll need this ‘KEY’ to that anger ‘tho, before ya start giving Him ‘Down the Road’.

What we end up with, are two paradoxes:

1. Job initially did not sin by charging God with wrong doing – but then spends 30-odd chapters seemingly doing just that.

2. God declares Job and his words righteous… and although Job is not rebuked for his anger, he still feels sorrow, and repents… even though he doesn’t need to.

Although Job got angry, and said that God wasn’t being fair… God still proclaims Job as righteous and to have spoken rightly. Why? Because he met with God.

This is why Job is praiseworthy. In the end, the desire to be vindicated was not as strong as his desire to meet with God. Once he had had an encounter with God, his anger disappeared. It was enough to know God… and to have been heard by Him.

There’s an anger that leads to a renewed relationship… and there is an anger that distances us from God.

The kind of red hot, passionate, dialoguing anger of Job’s is not sinful, but an essential part of the process and conversation with God when we are faced with things that we don’t understand. Don’t worry about the red hot anger… Worry when it solidifies into a cold resentment… a bitter silence that pushes us further from God.

I don’t see Job accusing God of wrongdoing. Rather, Job’s complaint is that God is not bringing justice to his situation, which is slightly different. Job is angry at the injustice and is righteously wrestling with God… all the while keeping his faith, that one day God Will vindicate him… to set things right.

We should be angry about injustice… and bring that anger to God, constantly calling him to set things right, to uphold his name and justice, to restore his world, and to vindicate his people, holding tight and refusing to let go. It seems to me… Job’s a perfect example of how to go about it.

During my own crisis of past years, my cousin reminded me that it was okay to go to God with all my broken pieces, and cry out to Him… To even beat upon His chest in my hurt, because He’s big enough to take it, and that at least there… as I beat upon His chest, I would be in the circle of His arms so that He could comfort me in my loss.”

And That’s How You Do That!
Douglas Duncan


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Father • Son • Holy Spirit, and The Shack For Two Brothers

The ShackI have been wondering, for several years, if there are other people who are convinced that the traditional teachings of the Church do not fulfill the accurate and true attitude, image, and mind-set of the Trinity. Specifically, why do we seem to separate the attitude and image of God the father from those of Jesus the Son, and the Holy Spirit?

I recently found a short yet significant read that is causing redefining moments in my thought processes. William P. Young (The Shack, 2007) presents compelling suggestions that we, as a Church, need to reassess the images we invoke when we speak of the attitude, image, and mind-set of the Trinity.

Traditional teachings seem to present that God the Father is a wise old man who sits in judgment. Sometimes we include the flowing long gray- or white-haired old man who wears a flowing robe. Usually we project a sternness of appearance, demeanor, and attitude. I suggest that many times we project God the Father as a proverbial taskmaster. Kind of like when we do something wrong (make an error, sin) look out because our error or sin has caused the Father to be angry. I suggest that the Father is not the angry God that Edwards (1741) presents in his sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God. Actually, the Father is quite the opposite. The second point of discussion is our projection of Jesus.

I humbly suggest that Jesus is not the epitome of a Jewish priest. My heart strings tell me that Jesus is more like the personal prayer partner or accountability partner that each of us should have, and, be to others. Yes, he is a priest. Yes, he is Jewish. Yes, he is the human form of God the Father. However, his role is not judgmental. Rather, reconciliation and relationship restoration. Biblical perspectives and stories suggest that Jesus is a hands-on, loving, caring, one-on-one relationship focused partner. His relationship with the disciples, His presentation to the woman at the well, His people-first behavior, His commitment to the Father’s will, are examples of Jesus’ dedication to people. In summary, we misrepresent God the Father and Jesus the Son as the good cop-bad cop cycle. The third point of discussion is our understanding of The Holy Spirit.

In short, I suggest that the Holy Spirit has two primary jobs. First, to commute between heaven and earth to present to God the Father, and Jesus the Son, evidence that we are behaving with a mind-of-Christ. Basically, to evidence that we are getting it right. The second job is to quietly convict us of our errors (sins). The Holy Spirit’s intent of conviction is to bring us into restored relationship that provides physical evidence so that the Holy Spirit may complete His primary job.

Young’s novelette presents a thorough review of our misconceptions while presenting plausible alternatives. His thought processes are interesting and Biblically valid. Enjoy the read.

Thanks for listening.
Dennis LeRoy Duncan

Edwards, Jonathan. (1741). Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God. Retrieved on 31 May 2008, from The Holy Bible. The Open Bible. King James Version. (1975). Thomas Nelson Publishers.

Young, William P. (2007). The Shack. Windblown Media, Los Angeles, California.

YOU Are Important

Rev. Dennis LeRoy Duncan, MSWhether you believe that God the Father, Jesus Christ the Son, and the Holy Spirit are who they claim to be does not change the fact that they are, indeed, who they claim to be. One part of this precept supports the notion that the Bible is literally the inspired word of God. Additional support for this hypothesis is provided in II Timothy 3:16 and provides concrete evidence of this hypothesis. Timothy states that “All scripture is given by inspiration of God…” This point is foundational to the Christian belief system and to our healthy development as human beings.

Let me explain.

The Biblical character, King David, notes in Psalms 139 that our God, the everlasting presence, knows everything there is to know about us. There is no place where we can hide from God, and no thought that we can prevent Him from knowing. Actually, King David suggests that God already knows our thoughts, needs and desires. How does this relate to YOU and your importance?

 

Knowing that the Bible is the inspired word of God, and King David is right in his Psalms 139:14 narrative when he states that “for I am fearfully and wonderfully made…”, then, before the beginning of time, God has known you. I suggest, no: I know, that YOU are so important that Christ designed your specific DNA before the Father actually spoke the creation narration. The artist Lindsey-Anderson depicts this concept in the painting on this page.

Please do not believe the doubts you sometimes have about your self, or what others may say or think about you. YOU are important! God said it, I believe it, that settles it! I love you.

 

1, Who is the artist in the picture, and how do you know. 2. What are your observations of the pencil, 3. What is the artist drawing?
Comments Welcomed on: 1, Who is the artist in the picture, and how do you know. 2. What are your observations of the pencil, 3. What is the artist drawing?

Dennis LeRoy Duncan

Ref:

The Holy Bible. The Open Bible. King James Version. (1975). Thomas Nelson Publishers.